White Walls Say Nothing

I got that title from a travel I did in 2015 to Buenos Aires, Argentina. I joined a graffiti walk arranged by Graffiti Mundo. I highly recommend for you to join if you plan to visit the city and interested to know a bit about the story behind those graffitis that liven up the city. 

In Buenos Aires, where you will meet the most genuine and friendly people (my experience!), one foreign artist admitted that to do a mural or other work on a wall will normally take longer time than in any other place, but he always loves doing it, every time. The reason is that the people in the neighbourhood will stop by, asking questions, offering some food, a mate tea (a traditional tea in Argentina), discuss or argue about the painting he is about to make.

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Some street art is political in nature and tells you stories of what the country faces/ faced during particular periods of time. Others may focus on showing the love of a certain football club, be dedicated to a musician, or something like that. And some are filled with secret messages that are only understood by the artists or certain groups.

I liked most of the murals/graffiti pieces I saw, but some I didn’t understand. But the idea to paint boring empty walls with meaningful and beautiful art that makes you stop, look and think is a great way to liven up a city. :)

Here are some samples of the street wall art I saw during my stay in Buenos Aires, Salta and Mendoza, Argentina.

 The artist, Pablo Harymbat, was born in 1977 in Buenos Aires, Argentina and began painting graffiti in the 1990’s. - graffitimundo.

The artist, Pablo Harymbat, was born in 1977 in Buenos Aires, Argentina and began painting graffiti in the 1990’s. - graffitimundo.

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 Haydée Mercedes Sosa (9 July 1935 – 4 October 2009), known as La Negra (literally: The Black Woman), was an Argentine singer who was popular throughout Latin America and many countries outside the continent.

Haydée Mercedes Sosa (9 July 1935 – 4 October 2009), known as La Negra (literally: The Black Woman), was an Argentine singer who was popular throughout Latin America and many countries outside the continent.

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The artist, Franco Fasoli aka “Jaz” studied and worked in scenography at the Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires, and studied painting with Jose Marchi, Nahuel Vecino and Diana Aisemberg. He is recognized as one of the first major graffiti writers to begin painting in the streets of Buenos Aires in the mid 1990’s. He explores identity, on both a personal and cultural level, in pieces that feature hybrid creatures, which are part man, part beast. - from the blog of graffitimundo.

The white head scarves worn by Argentine mothers (Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo) whose children were "disappeared" during the Dirty War of the military dictatorship, between 1976 and 1983.

 These are the Argentine mothers, some already passed away, who were at the Plaza de Mayo still protesting. I took this picture in 2015.

These are the Argentine mothers, some already passed away, who were at the Plaza de Mayo still protesting. I took this picture in 2015.

The pub/ restaurant where the owner once asked some of the artists to paint his restaurant with their arts and the owner gives some space on the backside of this place as a gallery where they can showcase their arts.

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Isn't it interesting to know some stories behind those graffitis? I learned a little bit history of Argentina in a different way just from the walk.